The Stone

The Stone
“Many facets, like a diamond. A diamond that nobody can see as a whole. Some will see one facet, others a second facet but will be blind to the first one that his neighbour can see. I meet you and one of my sides is shining more. Some see only the defects, others see only the purity of the stone. I’m each and every side, I’m the purity and the defect, I’m an outside brilliance and a hidden mystery… Some facets are like mirrors and you think you know me while you only see you own reflection…
I’d like to meet somebody who knows the secret of unity, whose eyes can see beyond what they grasp at first sight. Somebody who will know and understand I can be one thing and another at the same time, one thing and its opposite on the same moment… somebody who won’t be scared away by the dark defect he guesses through a thinner part of me, who won’t be blinded by the most sparkling ideas he guesses beneath the surface. Somebody who will be wise enough to let me show what I want to hide, who will be able to witness the alchemy working on me, from darkness to the purest clarity. Wise enough to let oblivion settles on outdated memories of who I used to be.
A dream of a constant rebirthing day after day, an unseen mutation into an unknown state of mind… no change is death… one track mind is vicious circle… I feel the infinity of life through my soul and through my body, and I cannot but let it display all the varieties of its crystallized energy.”

The Art of Cropping

Aspect ratio, or format, in photography is the proportions of the frame, the relationship between the width and the height of the picture. It depends on the sensor of the camera, but in our digital age, it can be changed in the settings in some types of DSLRs. And it is not without consequences. A picture may be better in a different format and one of the editing techniques is to change the aspect ratio if it’s needed by cropping the picture.

This post will deal with the main formats – there are a lot of others – and with their effects in the storytelling.

4:3
Kitten in the GrassHistory : It’s the former traditional TV format and a traditional format in photography.

Effect : Horizontal and vertical lines are balanced, though not equal. The effect is more or less neutral. In the landscape orientation, the horizontal plane is emphasized but the vertical plane keeps a significance too. In the portrait orientation, verticality is emphasized but the subject has enough space on both sides.

Continue reading The Art of Cropping

When Bad is Good

We all had to cope with badly focused pictures, an unwanted shaking, or a bad setting. And what we thought would be a great photo is just a big failure. But sometimes during the culling process, there are some of them that we just can’t get rid of. We like them. With their defects. We like the poetry showing through the blur, the mysterious emotion we feel nevertheless..

Night at Sea

bokeh flower

moving selfie

The Colours of Light

At the beginning, there was light. And black and white photography has emphasized the lines born out of light, the shapes emerging from darkness. Or is it darkness which carves the world out of light? We no longer know. They are the basic complementary building blocks of our perception, so intertwined that we cannot think about one without the other. The shadows and the highlights, the blacks and the whites, and all the palette of grays.
In black and white photography we grope our way in a world of forms, textures, matters. The world is well grounded, things are in order.

light-experimentThen, by a twist of the elements a new energy pours into these forms, and a new dimension arises : colours. They lay there, in the tiny display of the visible light for the human eye in the whole known electromagnetic spectrum – that’s to say, the fragmentation of light into wave lengths. We see these visible wave lengths as colours, and this small band is represented by the rainbow. But there are more than meet the eye. Invisible wave lengths flood the world of their invisible lights, and colours maybe. But the human eye seems not to perceive them and our brain is unable to decipher their presence. What we see is not the whole picture. There are also the infrareds, the micro waves, the radio waves, the ultraviolets, the X rays and the gamma rays, as far as we know.

RainbowAll the coloured beams light all the things around us. But for us, each object has a distinctive colour. If an object is red, for example, it is because red light is rejected, so to speak, from the surface of this object and the other colours are absorbed by it. We can only see refracted colours. How are the real surface of things? What are their intrinsic colour, if any? We can’t know, because we can’t see in the dark. And your camera can’t either. As a matter of fact, cameras don’t record colours. They record light and shadows. Colour photography needs devices to interpret shades of gray and match these shades with the corresponding colours. But it is a translation, an interpretation. That’s why colour hues, in photography, are so characteristic of an era, because techniques and inventions had to include this particular process of interpreting colours, and this interpretation has evolved over time.

Light and colours are not separate entities. They are one and the same. The way we see the world around us is the result of a network of interactions involving sunlight, matters and the way their surface deals with light, and more significantly, our eyes and our brain.

Super Moon 2014

This super moon 2014 was photographed all around the world and you can find many links dealing with it and showcasing the best pictures.

I had a try at photographing it too. It is actually not so difficult once you know why most of candid pictures of the moon are so blurry and displaying just a white big dot on the sky. If you want to experiment shooting the moon, you must first cope with the light. It is night but, though moonlight is indirect, it is very bright and you end up with highlights only. You must use a filter on your lense, theĀ  same kind of filter as if you were shooting in full sun. Longest zoom range.. Now you’re ready. Last point to be aware of is that the moon is not still. It moves at fast speed even if you don’t see it with your naked eye and you will be unable to have a steady shot if you don’t use a very quick shutter speed. Now you’re done. A bit of contrast and exposition adjustment on the computer and here it is. Happy with the result as it was my first successfull picture of the moon.

Super Moon